Partial Lunar Eclipse 16/7/19

 

PARTIAL LUNAR ECLIPSE

16/07/2019 – TAVISTOCK, DEVON, UK

Partial Lunar Eclipse – abt. 11.00

 

 

Kitchen

Hall   Lunar

Solar

 
             
20.15

168

144   169

167

 
20.30

168

144   169

167

 
20.45

163

135   169

167

 
21.00

154

124   161

167

PLE start 21.01
21.15

148

113   150

167

 
21.30

141

103   129

167

 
21.45

130

90   106

158

 
22.00

121

69   91

140

 
22.15

113

63   76

128

 
22.30

100

49   66

112

PLE max  66%
22.45

100

53   69

112

 
23.00

105

61   82

122

 
23.15

113

74   99

133

 
23.30

126

79   117

147

 
23.45

138

89   127

157

 
24.00

148

96   139

165

PLE end  23.59
             
08.00 (17/07)

150

123   163

167

 

 

 

Notes:

All times BST

All measurements in centimetres

 

Kitchen and Hall – widths of earth energy lines

Lunar and Solar – widths of ‘planetary’ grid lines

Solar only half of full width

(the other half inaccessible due to external wall)

 

Commentary

This partial lunar eclipse was 66% visible from the UK, and virtually unaffected by cloud cover.

The two earth energy lines reacted in a fairly typical manner, but took a longer time to reassert their original width (and were still significantly affected the following morning).  It appears that the informational transfer becomes partially embedded in the substance, or human perception, of the currents – either in terms of ‘charge’ or ‘memory’, depending on whether the dowser is understanding the process as essentially physical (or metaphysical) – or purely on an informational level.

Both earth energy lines were untypically wide even before the start of the measurements – probably due to other cosmic or planetary factors and/or the input of the dowser.

The planetary grid lines (or more accurately in this instance celestial grid lines) reacted more slowly, with the solar line seemingly rather ‘reluctant’ to get involved at all.  Both lines had almost reverted to their previous widths by the following morning.

Although the event occurred exactly 50 years after the first human landing on the moon by the Apollo 11 astronauts, the only impact of this calendrical co-incidence would be in the mind of the dowser.

 

Nigel Twinn

July 2019